Contraception Chart

Common Name

Medical Description Method of Contraception Does It Require a Prescription? Is There a CopaymentA fixed dollar amount you may pay for a covered health care service or drug.?
The Pill4 Combined oral contraceptive pills or progesterone only contraceptive pills1 Short-acting reversible contraception. Taken orally to prevent ovulation. Yes
  • Military hospital or clinic – No
  • Network provider – No for Active Duty Service Members; Yes for all others
IUD Intrauterine device, commonly copper or progesterone Implant placed in the uterus to prevent fertilization. Yes. Placed by clinician.
  • Military hospital or clinic –No
  • Network provider – Yes2
Getting your tubes tied3 Tubal ligation, tubal interruption or tubal removal (salpingectomy) Surgical sterilization by disrupting the ability of the egg to travel from the ovary. Also blocks sperm from traveling through the fallopian tube. Yes. Performed by GYN surgeon.
  • Military hospital or clinic – No
  • Network provider – Yes2
Vasectomy Vasectomy Surgical sterilization by disrupting the ability of the sperm to be ejaculated. Yes. Performed by a clinician.
  • Military hospital or clinic – No
  • Network provider – Yes
Birth control shot4 Depo Provera – intramuscular progesterone injection Injection which suppresses ovulation. Given every three months. Yes
  • Military hospital or clinic – No
  • Network provider - No2
"Morning After" pill Plan B and Plan B One-Step (levonorgestrelEmergency contraceptive used to prevent pregnancy. It's also known as Plan B. It's available to all beneficiaries for free without a prescription.) Emergency contraception that inhibits or postpones ovulation to prevent fertilization. Ideally used within three days of unprotected sex, but may be extended to up to five days after unprotected sex. No. Available over-the-counter.
  • Military hospital or clinic – No
  • Network provider – No
Ella (ulipristal acetate)  Yes
  • Military hospital or clinic – No
  • Network provider – No for Active Duty Service Members; Yes for all others
Condoms or gel Barrier methods – male condoms, female condoms, spermicide Barrier methods prevent direct contact between sperm and egg. Spermicide kills the sperm to prevent fertilization. No Not Covered
Birth control implant4 Nexplanon – subdermal progesterone implant Small implant under the skin that provides 3-4 years of reversible contraception by preventing ovulation. Yes. Placed by clinician.
  • Military hospital or clinic – No
  • Network provider – No2
Contraceptive patch4 or ring Ortho Evra, Nuvaring, contraceptive transdermal patch, contraceptive vaginal ring Short-acting reversible contraception that is put in place by the patient. Yes
  • Military hospital or clinic – No
  • Network provider – No for Active Duty Service Members; Yes for all others

While the brand names of various medications and devices may not be available everywhere, the formulary will carry or obtain the formulation you need.

2 Effective back to July 28, 2022. If you paid for services on or after July 28, you can submit a claim to your TRICARE contractor after Nov. 1 to receive reimbursement.

Starting Jan. 1, 2023, TRICARE will eliminate copayments and cost-shares for anyone who has a TRICARE Prime option or TRICARE Select, and chooses a permanent birth control method.

4 May also be prescribed to moderate or suppress menstrual cycles.

Last Updated 10/3/2022